likeafieldmouse:

Christo & Jeanne-Claude - Wrapped Coast (completed installation, construction & preparatory studies, 1968-9)

omgthatdress:

Dress
1860s
Augusta Auctions

omgthatdress:

Dress

1860s

Augusta Auctions

centuriespast:

Portrait of a Lady, 1641

Johannes Corneliszoon Verspronck
Dutch, 1606/9-1662
Oil on canvas
31-1/8 x 26-1/8 in. (79.1 x 66.4 cm)
The Norton Simon Foundation

centuriespast:

Portrait of a Lady, 1641

Johannes Corneliszoon Verspronck

Dutch, 1606/9-1662

Oil on canvas

31-1/8 x 26-1/8 in. (79.1 x 66.4 cm)

The Norton Simon Foundation

tierradentro:

“Still Life with Steer’s Skull”, 1908, Pablo Picasso.

tierradentro:

Still Life with Steer’s Skull”, 1908, Pablo Picasso.

(via cavetocanvas)

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  The sculptor Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux painted this wild little image in about 1870, and it’s now one of the most impressive and surprising pieces in the survey of his work at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. The canvas shows his wife giving birth (so I’m not sure why the experts are in doubt about its date). It must be one of the first – and only – Old Master pictures to document that moment. Whatever the drawing’s relationship to an actual scene Carpeaux might have witnessed, it is amazing that he could conceive of birthing in such grandly romantic terms, and that he would want to claim to have made a record of it.
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  The sculptor Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux painted this wild little image in about 1870, and it’s now one of the most impressive and surprising pieces in the survey of his work at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. The canvas shows his wife giving birth (so I’m not sure why the experts are in doubt about its date). It must be one of the first – and only – Old Master pictures to document that moment. Whatever the drawing’s relationship to an actual scene Carpeaux might have witnessed, it is amazing that he could conceive of birthing in such grandly romantic terms, and that he would want to claim to have made a record of it.

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

omgthatdress:

Summer Corset
1895
The Victoria & Albert Museum

omgthatdress:

Summer Corset

1895

The Victoria & Albert Museum

rhamphotheca:

New Research Finds That Humans Are Responsible for Extinction of Giant Birds on New Zealand
by Jeremy Hance
Moas were a diverse group of flightless birds that ruled over New Zealand up to the arrival of humans, the biggest of these mega-birds stood around 3.5 meters (12 feet) with outstretched neck. While the whole moa family—comprised of nine species—vanished shortly after the arrival of people on New Zealand in the 13th Century, scientists have long debated why the big birds went extinct. Some theories contend that the birds were already in decline due to environmental changes or volcanic activity before humans first stepped on New Zealand’s beaches. But a study released today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) finds no evidence of said decline, instead pointing the finger squarely at us.  To find the moa’s smoking gun, scientists analyzed two different sets of DNA from 281 specimens made up of four species: the South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus), the biggest of the family; the heavy-footed moa (Pachyornis elephantopus); the eastern moa (Emeus crassus); and the coastal moa (Euryapteryx curtus). Instead of showing a slow, genetic decline, the DNA told a different story: moas were thriving even as humans arrived…
(read more: MongaBay)
illustration by MIchael B.H./Wikimedia Commons

rhamphotheca:

New Research Finds That Humans Are Responsible for Extinction of Giant Birds on New Zealand

by Jeremy Hance

Moas were a diverse group of flightless birds that ruled over New Zealand up to the arrival of humans, the biggest of these mega-birds stood around 3.5 meters (12 feet) with outstretched neck. While the whole moa family—comprised of nine species—vanished shortly after the arrival of people on New Zealand in the 13th Century, scientists have long debated why the big birds went extinct. Some theories contend that the birds were already in decline due to environmental changes or volcanic activity before humans first stepped on New Zealand’s beaches. But a study released today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) finds no evidence of said decline, instead pointing the finger squarely at us.

To find the moa’s smoking gun, scientists analyzed two different sets of DNA from 281 specimens made up of four species: the South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus), the biggest of the family; the heavy-footed moa (Pachyornis elephantopus); the eastern moa (Emeus crassus); and the coastal moa (Euryapteryx curtus). Instead of showing a slow, genetic decline, the DNA told a different story: moas were thriving even as humans arrived…

(read more: MongaBay)

illustration by MIchael B.H./Wikimedia Commons

(via scientificillustration)

christineneo:

I’ve always found something incredibly fascinating about the cross section and cellular structure of plants and flowers, how familiar and unfamiliar they are at the same time.

christineneo:

I’ve always found something incredibly fascinating about the cross section and cellular structure of plants and flowers, how familiar and unfamiliar they are at the same time.

(via scientificillustration)

roachasaurus:

Working on some anteaters

(via scientificillustration)

omgthatdress:

Evening Dress
1925
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Evening Dress

1925

The Metropolitan Museum of Art