feathersandbeaks:

"The Common Poorwill (Phalaenoptilus nuttallii) is a nocturnal bird of the family Caprimulgidae, the nightjars. It is found from British Columbia and southeastern Alberta, through the western United States to northern Mexico. The bird’s habitat is dry, open areas with grasses or shrubs, and even stony desert slopes with very little vegetation.
Many northern birds migrate to winter within the breeding range in central and western Mexico, though some remain further north. Remarkably, the Common Poorwill is the only bird known to go into torpor for extended periods (weeks to months).[2] This happens on the southern edge of its range in the United States, where it spends much of the winter inactive, concealed in piles of rocks. This behavior has been reported in California and New Mexico. Such an extended period of torpor is close to a state of hibernation, not known among other birds. It was described definitively by Dr. Edmund Jaeger in 1948 based on a Poorwill he discovered hibernating in the Chuckwalla Mountains of California in 1946.”
(Source: Common Poorwill)
The extended period of torpor is highly unusual — really interesting life history trait!

feathersandbeaks:

"The Common Poorwill (Phalaenoptilus nuttallii) is a nocturnal bird of the family Caprimulgidae, the nightjars. It is found from British Columbia and southeastern Alberta, through the western United States to northern Mexico. The bird’s habitat is dry, open areas with grasses or shrubs, and even stony desert slopes with very little vegetation.

Many northern birds migrate to winter within the breeding range in central and western Mexico, though some remain further north. Remarkably, the Common Poorwill is the only bird known to go into torpor for extended periods (weeks to months).[2] This happens on the southern edge of its range in the United States, where it spends much of the winter inactive, concealed in piles of rocks. This behavior has been reported in California and New Mexico. Such an extended period of torpor is close to a state of hibernation, not known among other birds. It was described definitively by Dr. Edmund Jaeger in 1948 based on a Poorwill he discovered hibernating in the Chuckwalla Mountains of California in 1946.”

(Source: Common Poorwill)

The extended period of torpor is highly unusual — really interesting life history trait!

(via scientificillustration)

medicalillustration:

Week 30: surgical illustration of thenar trauma | original sketch in pencil and then I cleaned up everything in photoshop

Very thankful for all the anatomy textbooks and skeletal models that are lying around in the studio. I still need to shade everything in but it’s getting there. Slooooow and steady…

(via scientificillustration)

ooksaidthelibrarian:

n68_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.
Via Flickr: Fabre’s book of insects,. New York :Dodd, Mead and company,1921..biodiversitylibrary.org/page/8611623

ooksaidthelibrarian:

n68_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Fabre’s book of insects,.
New York :Dodd, Mead and company,1921..
biodiversitylibrary.org/page/8611623

(via scientificillustration)

justanothermasterpiece:

Hans Hoffman.

justanothermasterpiece:

Hans Hoffman.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: I spotted this strange little 1952 piece at the Germaine Richier show that opened yesterday at Dominique Lévy and Galerie Perrotin in New York.  Although unknown in the States – her last American show was at the Martha Jackson Gallery in 1957! – at home in Europe Richier counts as a superstar of postwar French sculpture, up there (almost) with Louise Bourgeois. The many bronzes at Levy and Perotin show Richier in pitch-perfect command of the era’s angstful existentialism.  That’s why I prefer the couple of lead works that have also been included: They are absolutely peculiar and somehow wrong – in all the right ways. There’s something brilliantly wrongheaded, for instance, about including a girlish yellow stone in what is otherwise a mess of Dubbufetian slag.
No matter how coarse a bronze may look, you always know it’s the product of extreme, self-conscious refinement. No one dares claim that for Richier’s leads.  
For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: I spotted this strange little 1952 piece at the Germaine Richier show that opened yesterday at Dominique Lévy and Galerie Perrotin in New York.  Although unknown in the States – her last American show was at the Martha Jackson Gallery in 1957! – at home in Europe Richier counts as a superstar of postwar French sculpture, up there (almost) with Louise Bourgeois. The many bronzes at Levy and Perotin show Richier in pitch-perfect command of the era’s angstful existentialism.  That’s why I prefer the couple of lead works that have also been included: They are absolutely peculiar and somehow wrong – in all the right ways. There’s something brilliantly wrongheaded, for instance, about including a girlish yellow stone in what is otherwise a mess of Dubbufetian slag.

No matter how coarse a bronze may look, you always know it’s the product of extreme, self-conscious refinement. No one dares claim that for Richier’s leads.  

For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

thegetty:

Detailed views of the dazzling ancient monuments of Central America through the eyes (and hands) of english explorers. 

Castle at Tulum, 1844, Frederick Catherwood. Getty Research Institute.
Plate 158, No. 2 in Incidents of travel in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucatan, 1853, John Lloyd Stephens. Getty Research Institute.
[Idol and altar at Copan] in Views of ancient monuments in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucatan, 1844, Frederick Catherwood. Getty Research Institute.
Archway; Casa del Governador, Uxmal, Frederick Catherwood (author), Andrew Picken (lithographer). Getty Research Institute.

(via scientificillustration)

mid0nz:

The Look of Sherlock Season 3, E1 & E2:
Gregory Crewdson's Influence on Steve Lawes 

Gregory Crewdson

Crewdson’s photographs usually take place in small town America, but are dramatic and cinematic. They feature often disturbing, surreal events. The photographs are shot using a large crew and are elaborately staged and lighted. He has cited the films Vertigo, The Night of the Hunter, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Blue Velvet, and Safe as having influenced his style, as well as the painter Edward Hopper and photographer Diane Arbus.

Steve Lawes: …what I love about Crewdson’s work is that he captures what I feel we really see with our eyes although it’s heightened and it’s exaggerated. It’s that idea of sodium light, that sort of radiation you get off sodium light, fluorescent light, all those different tones and colors you know how they kick off a pavement, how they kick off the road, things like wet-downs you know. I’m forever winding production up because I want roads wet down.

If you look at a Crewdson frame it’s like a painting. It’s like a Dutch master: you can look at parts of the frame, you can sit there. That’s what I try and do with my cinematography. I try and create frames that if they were put on a still people would look at them and go “there’s depth in the frame” which brings me to the importance of framing and relationships in the frame. 

In terms of influences I’d say that Crewdson has probably had the most dramatic influence on me in terms of you could probably look at Crewdson’s work and then look at my work and see that there’s a similarity.

…what I love about Crewdson’s work is that again there is this scale and this color and there’s everything. They’re paintings. I tend to be drawn to darker things you know dark in terms of contrast but also dark as in terms of subject. I find it more interesting. The kind of underbelly. There’s something I love about Crewdson’s work which is that there’s something not quite… it always feels slightly on edge. There’s something not quite right about it. I think it’s really interesting the idea that you… it’s about being as subtle as possible. And I think what Crewdson does so well is that he does lots of really dramatic things but he does them very subtly.  So what you’re actually getting and the fact that he creates this frame and does the shot and you look at it. A lot of time when you start off in terms of cinematography or photography… when I first started I wouldn’t put a light somewhere unless I thought it was justified because if you want your lighting to look real then really it should only come in the direction the sun comes in. Well you soon learn that if you do that you’re on a hiding to nothing because it’s very difficult to do that. What you tend to do is you tend to stick to that rule but then you bend it slightly which is what Crewdson does which is if you want to have a different color in the frame you can create different color in the frame. You don’t necessarily need to justify it. It can be there for an aesthetic reason. It can be there for all sorts of reasons. What you’re actually doing is you’re creating different things in the frame because you have the ability to do that. Visually Crewdson’s been a very big influence on me.

(X)

botanybecca:

Working on a presentation on ginkgo at the moment. This is a beautiful image from Siebold and Zuccarini’s Flora Japonica from the 19th century, illustrating the difference between short shoot and long shoot leaves of Ginkgo biloba. Short shoots produce a lot of leaves and provide a lot of energy with minimal investment in woody tissue. Long shoots contribute to branch elongation and allow the tree to compete with neighbours for light. 

botanybecca:

Working on a presentation on ginkgo at the moment. This is a beautiful image from Siebold and Zuccarini’s Flora Japonica from the 19th century, illustrating the difference between short shoot and long shoot leaves of Ginkgo biloba. Short shoots produce a lot of leaves and provide a lot of energy with minimal investment in woody tissue. Long shoots contribute to branch elongation and allow the tree to compete with neighbours for light. 

(via scientificillustration)